Archive for the ‘cocktail’Category

Green tomatoes inspire tequila cocktail

Acqua Fresco at RialtoTwo years ago we passed along Gerry Jobe’s recipe for the Killer Tomato Cocktail, and this harvest season we discovered another way to drink tomatoes, courtesy of the Bar at Rialto, Jody Adams’ terrific restaurant in the Charles Hotel in our hometown of Cambridge, Massachusetts. The smooth and elegant tequila drink with lots of layers of flavor — created by Rialto beverage director Young Won — seemed especially timely since it uses green tomatoes. By the looks of our garden, we’ll still be gathering them right up until frost. Like many craft cocktails, you have to make many of the components well in advance, so plan accordingly.

ACQUA FRESCO… GREEN TOMATO, THAI BASIL, GINGER, MINT OIL

To make the acqua fresco:
4 green tomatoes, chopped to 2-inch pieces
large bunch of Thai basil leaves and stalk, torn into pieces
scant teaspoon sea salt

Place all ingredients into a blender or food processor. Puree until well blended. Strain though a conical sieve (chinois) lined with coffee filter. Allow three hours for liquid to strain out. Chill strained liquid.

To make the ginger syrup:
Combine 3 parts freshly pressed ginger juice with 1 part sugar and shake into solution.

To make the mint oil:
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
large bunch of mint

Blanch the mint and squeeze out excess water. Warm the olive oil in a stainless steel saucepan. Add the blanched mint and cook for a few minutes over low to medium heat. Set aside and let cool. Strain the oil through a very fine mesh.

To assemble the cocktail:

2 ounces green tomato and Thai basil acqua fresco
1 ounce 123 Reposado tequila
1/4 ounce ginger syrup
Glassware: coupe glass
Garnish: three drops of mint oil or an edible flower

Add first three ingredients to a shaker tin. Add ice and shake vigorously. Double strain into a chilled coupe. Dress with three drops of mint oil or an edible flower.

29

08 2014

Port opens its collar a bit

vindimando pinhao 2The fourth generation of the Symington clan that came to Portugal in 1882, Dominic Symington is one of a passel of cousins who run the wide-ranging port empire that includes Cockburn’s, Warre’s, Dow’s, and Graham’s, along with Quinto do Vesúvio and Altano table wines. When a group of us touring wine estates in the Douro Valley stopped in Pinhao to see the amazing tile murals at the train station (like the one above), Symington offered to pick us up for lunch – by boat. Dominic

We met him at the town dock, where one of his daughters and a friend were helping him dock his small speedboat. “It’s much faster than driving on the road,” he shrugged, as we sped a half hour upriver to the Quinta dos Malvedos of the Graham’s port company. He was particularly keen to show us the technology – first the traditional concrete lagars in which port grapes are pressed by foot. “This is wine as it was made in Biblical times,” he said. “If Caesar’s legion came marching in at harvest time, they would know just what to do – to climb in the lagar and start marching back and forth.”

There are tremendous advantages to this type of grape treading. The human foot crushes the skins just about perfectly to extract the deep color and the phenolic tannins that a wine like port needs to be full bodied and age well. The system has disadvantages, too, particularly when it comes to temperature control. Over the three weeks of harvest and crushing for port, the concrete warms up a lot from the combination of human body temperature and chemical reactions during the fermentation.

lagarEnter the Symington clan’s robotic treader: The lagars (troughs about knee deep) are replaced with stainless steel trays only slightly larger. Heating and cooling elements in the sides keep the fermentation temperature under control. And a robotic treader – with foot-sized pistons coated with silicon rubber – replaces the grape stompers by providing exactly the same pressure are the human foot (for geek readers, that’s 20 kg per square centimeter).

Symington also noted that almost everyone in the port wine business understands their vineyards much better than 20 years ago. That has meant better port year to year – and a lot more vintage port, which is the fruity version of port that ages in the bottle rather than in the cask. But for all the improvements in high-end vintage port and the older, more complex tawny ports (he poured a 20-year-old tawny port and a 1991 vintage port to illustrate the differences), The Symington brands are “seeking to deformalize port,” as he put it. tawny

It was a blisteringly hot day (not uncommon in the Douro Valley), so he offered an aperitif. Clink-clink-clink went three ice cubes into a lowball glass. Symington filled it half full with white port, topped up with tonic water, and slid a thin slice of lemon into each drink, apologizing that he was out of lime for the moment. The reinvention of the white wine spritzer was the perfect antidote to the heat. With its touch of sweetness and crisp, mouthfilling acids, it was about as far as I could imagine from a ruminative post-dinner glass of tawny port.

“Stick the port in the freezer for an hour,” Dominic said, “and you can skip the ice cubes.”

29

06 2013

Sipping a Seelbach Cocktail on Urban Bourbon Trail

Seelbach Michael Anderson I always think of the mint julep as the classic Kentucky drink, but there’s more than one way to imbibe the Bluegrass State’s signature spirit, Kentucky Bourbon. As I reported in the January 12 issue of the Boston Globe Travel section, I’m only two drinks away from claiming an Urban Bourbon Trail T-shirt. It’s offered to anyone who visits six of the 20 participating bourbon bars and restaurants in Louisville. (Click here to see the Globe story.)

The Seelbach Cocktail, named for the classic hotel where it was invented in 1917, is one of those great accidents that seem to happen at bars as the night wears on. The drink originated when champagne overflowed into a Manhattan, beverage supervisor Michael Anderson (above) told me. “It’s a cocktail with whiskey for people who don’t like whiskey,” he opined.

Seelbach drink 2 The recipe disappeared during Prohibition. but was rediscovered in 1995. Here’s how Anderson makes it today, using fewer bitters than the original 14 dashes, but sticking with Old Forester, America’s first bottled bourbon.

SEELBACH COCKTAIL

1 ounce bourbon (Old Forester)
1/2 ounce Cointreau
3 dashes Angostura Bitters
4 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters
Champagne

Stir the bourbon, Cointreau, and bitters briefly over ice. Strain into a flute and top with brut Champagne.

24

01 2013