Posts Tagged ‘Valdobbiadene’

TWL: Prosecco lifestyle at Villa Sandi

prosecco villa sandi Villa Sandi (Via Erizzo 112, Crocetta del Montello; +39-0423-665-033; www.villasandi.it) is one of the most striking producers of both Prosecco DOC and Prosecco DOCG wines. The winery’s headquarters and cellars sit amid formal gardens in a verdant landscape. The property resembles a fairytale version of how a distinguished Italian winery should look.

prosecco villa sandi Nestled into the hills of the Marca Trevigiana about 25 kilometers northwest of Treviso, the estate borders the Piave river. The cellars once had a passageway that led to the riverbank, which Italian soldiers used to move surreptitiously during World War I. The villa itself, pictured above, is a splendid example of Palladian architecture built in 1622. It is a real period piece, with several rooms maintained in high 17th-century style, complete with Murano glass chandeliers and furniture with intricate marquetry. Not surprisingly, Villa Sandi serves as a venue for a number of important wine events in northern Italy, including courses for sommeliers and a regular lecture series.

prosecco villa sandi The cellars are somewhat newer than the villa. The oldest section dates from about 1700, and the full 1.5km extent of the passageways was finished in the 20th century. The cellar walls are all lined with brick and the barrels sit on beds of gravel to ensure good drainage and air circulation. Tours of the villa and cellars can be arranged Mondays-Saturdays by calling the main number (+39-0423-665-033) or by email to info@villasandi.it. Tours are available in Italian or English.

prosecco villa sandi Villa Sandi is owned by the Moretti Polegato family, and the aristocratic Giancarlo Moretti Polegato serves as the company’s president. (His brother, Mario, is the founder and president of Geox shoes, in case you were wondering how well the family manages.) For travelers who wish to stay in the immediate area, the winery also owns a rustic country house, Locanda Sandi, about 10km away (Loc. Zecchei, Via Tessere 1, Valdobbiadene; +39-0423-976-239; www.locandasandi.it). There are just six simply-finished rooms. The one single room costs €60, the five double rooms are €85 each. The Locanda also has a superb restaurant that seats 70, with an additional 100 seats on the outdoor terrace in the summer. Open Friday-Tuesday for lunch and dinner, it serves traditional local dishes of the Veneto—and the wines of Villa Sandi. Figure on €25 per person for a modest three-course meal with wine.

Villa Sandi Prosecco

prosecco villa sandi Villa Sandi straddles the Valdobbiadene DOCG region and the Montello and Piave DOC wine regions. Moreover, the company owns 4 hectares in the highly prized Cartizze cru of Valdobbiadene. To give an idea of the significance of that plot, Cartizze has only a total of 107 hectares divided among 140 producers. Although the company makes a number of still wines, the core of its production consists of Prosecco, including nine different spumantes and two frizzantes. Just to confuse things, Villa Sandi also makes a limited number of sparkling wines from chardonnay and pinot nero using the “classico” method (i.e., in-bottle secondary fermentation in the manner of Champagne).

prosecco villa sandi I can’t say I tasted them all, but I was struck by the complexity and depth of the Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore DOCG Millesimato, and the sheer quaffability of the Prosecco DOC Treviso. Judging by the smile on his face when we sat down to lunch, Giancarlo was pretty happy with the Millesimato as well.

25

10 2014

TWL: Visiting the school for Prosecco

Prosecco Conegliano

Vineyard of Glera clones at Oenology School.

According to the Prosecco DOC consortium, farmers in the Friuli Venezia-Giulia village of Prosecco began making sparkling wine from the grape now known as Glera around 1600, and it became so popular that it spread to nine provinces in the 17th century. (Those provinces now lie within Friuli and the Veneto, and the symbol of Prosecco DOC is nine wine glasses.) Originally a farmhouse wine, Prosecco would stop fermenting in the fall when the weather cooled, then begin again in the spring, when it was sold as a “frizzante” wine. Antonio Carpenain invented modern Prosecco in the mid-19th century when he began using a pressurized tank for a second fermentation. His adaptation of France’s Charmat process quickly became known as “The Italian Method.”

Prosecco The full history lesson is something you can learn at the School of Oenology & Viticulture in Conegliano — or better yet, at the adjacent Enoteca Regionale Veneta (Via Giovanni Dalmasso 12, Conegliano, +39 0438-455-138, www.enotecaveneta.it). Carpenain established the school in 1876, and it still trains more than 90 percent of the region’s winemakers. It’s also a research center for establishing the characteristics of different grapes and clones of known varietals. (That’s one of the school’s vineyards above.)

While the school does have a Bottega del Vino on the property where you can learn about some of the experimental wines made at the school (and purchase them after a tasting), it is open mainly on weekdays. The Enoteca is for both the more considered drinker, and possibly the partier. It is open Tuesday through Saturday from 6 p.m. until midnight with light snacks and the opportunity to taste any of the wines in the library. The collection includes about 500 still wines from the Veneto, as well as about 100 different Proseccos. There are typically a dozen open bottles of chilled whites, about half of them Proseccos. But if something else on the shelves piques your curiosity, you need only ask.

Some technical matters

The street of the Enoteca is named for Giovanni Dalmasso, who proposed the first delimitation of “Prosecco Superiore” around Conegliano and nearby Valdobbiadene in 1936. Finally, in 1969, the Conegliano Valdobbiadene DOC was created. In 1977, the Prosecco IGT (Indicazione Geografica Tipica, or “typical of the region”) was established and in 2009, the Prosecco DOC was created to certify IGT producers who met all the consortium’s criteria. Just to confuse things more, the Conegliano Valdobbiadene DOC is now Prosecco Conegliano Valdobbiadene DOCG. Total production varies by year, of course, but in 2013 there were about 241 million bottles of Prosecco DOC and 70 million bottles of Prosecco DOCG.

What does this mean in practice for the buyer at an American wine shop? As a rule of thumb both DOC and DOCG certification indicates that the wine hails from the Prosecco region and is made according to some fairly strict regulations. The main grape is Glera (a rebaptism of the Prosecco grape to stop other countries from making sparkling wine called Prosecco), and there are three styles. The simplest and cheapest is frizzante, which has less than 2.5 atmospheres of pressure. Bubbles tend to dissipate quickly and most frizzante wines are low in alcohol. Prosecco brut (the most popular style in the U.S.) has higher alcohol, tighter and more persistent bubbles, and is bottled around 3 atmospheres. Extra dry, often with less persistent bubbles, is bottled around the same pressure but has more residual sugar than brut.

Prosecco

Vineyards in the rolling countryside of Conegliano.

24

09 2014