charcuterie

San Antonio’s Cured is good for whatever ails you

Long known as the cradle of Tex-Mex cuisine, San Antonio has definitely upped its game in the last few years. Until recently, a smattering of upscale, fine-dining restaurants like John Besh's Lüke on the Riverwalk and a plethora of steak houses formed the city's gastronomic constellation. That's changing quickly and a lot of action is taking place in the suddenly trendy Pearl District. San Antonio's spring-fed eponymous river made it an important beer-brewing town in the 19th century. The predecessor to Pearl Brewing opened in 1883, and the factory didn't close until 2001. The subsequent redevelopment of the 22-acre former Pearl complex is still underway, but it's already ground zero for serious foodies. Not only does the complex contain the San Antonio campus of the...Read More

Meeting the master of meat

Bruno Bassetto of Treviso, Italy, knows meat. The 61-year-old butcher set a Guinness World Record in October by crafting a salamella—a kind of fresh pork sausage—more than 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) long. I had the good fortune to watch him trim a piece of round and make steak tartare in seconds with a pair of huge knives. But beyond his obvious showmanship, Bassetto is also a master of charcuterie. In addition to fresh meat, his butcher shop (via Mantiero 22, Treviso; 011-39-0422-231-945, www.brunobassettocarni.it) also carries fresh and cured sausages, which range from slender little pepperoni to a great expression of the local Veneto sopressa (a soft, cured sausage about 3 inches in diameter). In late fall and winter, he also makes a cooked pork sausage...Read More