Posts Tagged ‘New Albany’

NABC proves brewpub grub can be healthy, too

With its working-class-hero graphics and its no-nonsense approach to craft brewing, the New Albanian Brewing Company (NABC) has been providing the suds of choice for thirsty folks in New Albany, Indiana, since 2002. In 2009, the original pizzeria brewery, now called NABC Pizzeria & Public House (3312 Plaza Drive, 812-944-2577) was augmented by the downtown NABC Café & Brewhouse (415 Bank St., 812-944-2577, newalbanian.com).

Stacey serves meal at NABCIn 2015, Stacie Bale took over as café operations manager. Serving both lunch and dinner, the café bustles, even outside the normal evening hours when brewpubs do their biggest business. Bale’s approach to the grub has something to do with that. She aims to make brewpub fare as healthy as possible both for the customers and for the local agricultural community. With those goals in mind, Bale sources most of her raw ingredients locally, makes a point of using non-GMO corn, cornstarch, and local oil (no mean feat in corn country), and offers a range of plant-based meals. Bacon, chicken, and beef are all free range and pasture-fed from nearby Hensley Homegrown.

One of the most impressive innovations Bale introduced to the menu was greaseless air frying. She keeps an array of small air fryers lined up in the kitchen so several fried dishes can be produced at once. Most are used for crispy waffle fries, onion rings, or the occasional catfish special.

NABC beerThe beers show a great range from agreeable session ales (like the one shown here) to the extremely hopped and high-alcohol Hoptimus. That’s an IPA with 10.7 percent alcohol and 100 IBU (international bitterness units). Bale uses the Community Dark (3.7 percent alcohol, 13.2 IBU) to great effect to make Beer Mac & Cheese, one of the favorite side dishes. She was kind enough to share the recipe. If you don’t have NABC handy, use your local brewery’s brown ale.

NEW ALBANIAN BEER MAC & CHEESE


NABC mac and cheeseServes 4 as main course, 8 as a side dish

Ingredients


2 cups uncooked macaroni
12 ounces NABC beer (Community Dark or 15-B)
8 ounces cream cheese
2 cups shredded cheddar
2 teaspoons chili powder
cayenne to taste (start with 1/8 teaspoon)
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons pepper

Directions


Boil a large pot of salted water. Once boiling, cook the macaroni until tender (8-10 minutes). Stir occasionally. Drain and set aside.

Meanwhile, pour beer in a second large pot. Place the pot over high heat, and add the cream cheese. As the beer starts to simmer, break the cream cheese into pieces with a whisk and whisk into the beer. Add the 2 cups shredded cheddar. Warm and whisk until completely smooth.

Once the pasta is cooked and drained, pour it into the cheese sauce. Reduce the heat to low, then stir and cook another 3 minutes to thicken. Add spices and mix in thoroughly.

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11 2017

Swank cocktails on two sides of the Ohio

Bartender mixes Remember the Maine at Mr. Lee's Lounge in Louisville

When we walked up to the plain, brick-fronted building on a residential stretch of Goss Avenue in Louisville’s Germantown, we were dubious that we’d come to the right spot. But sure enough, a tiny brass plaque announced the structure as “Mr. Lee’s.”

exterior of Mr. Lee's in LouisvilleWe opened the door and stepped through the portal of a time machine. As our vision slowly returned in the all-enveloping darkness, we found ourselves in a film-noir world. We half expected to see Nick and Nora of The Thin Man trading snappy bon mots between sips in the corner booth. The brightest spot in the place was the center of the horseshoe-shaped bar. The brass and glass and steel gleamed. The bartender’s white shirt seemed to glow. Welcome to Mr. Lee’s Lounge (935 Goss Ave., Louisville, 502-450-5368, mrleeslounge.com). The Coen brothers couldn’t have staged it better.

Every bar and every lounge is peddling a fantasy narrative—whether it’s the good-ol’-boy, shot-and-a-beer watering hole or a snazzy lounge with velvet drapes and leather banquettes. But Mr. Lee’s is the only place we know in Louisville that aims for and hits the mark of “sophisticated with just a whiff of danger.” It has a speakeasy vibe that feels like just the place where a guy might loosen his tie, unbutton his collar, roll up his sleeves and contemplate the state of the universe. That would be over a house-smoked Old Fashioned made with Buffalo Trace bourbon, smoked black tea, and bitters. It’s not all retro, though—many drinks use spirits from Copper & Kings. (See previous post.)

Be sure to visit after dark. Otherwise, it hurts your eyes to come out into the sunlight.

The Butcher at The Butcher and Brooklyn in New Albany, Indiana

A cocktail to chew on


Across the Ohio, Brooklyn and the Butcher (148 East Market St., New Albany, IN, 812-590-2646, brooklynandthebutcher.com) emphasizes small plates, big steaks, and a cocktail program that stays in touch with the urban trends. A relative newcomer (it opened in early 2016), the restaurant has become New Albany’s go-to spot for steak and tony spirits. The dining room is bright and breezy, and so is the upstairs lounge by the big windows on Market Street.

The photo here shows that upstairs lounge, where we stopped for drinks because the steakhouse restaurant side had not yet opened for dinner. The basement also contains a hideaway known as the Lantern Bar. It shares some of the speakeasy vibe of Mr. Lee’s, but plays on its cellar location with exposed brick walls, candles on the tables, and jazz on the weekends. Brooklyn and the Butcher maintains a good wine and beer list to complement its spirits, but cocktails are the focus of the beverage program.

Given the name of the place, we had to order a drink called The Butcher. (That’s it above the subhead.) Fat-washed cocktails are all the rage—or have been since the first bartender figured out how to infuse bacon into bourbon. The Butcher is a pretty sophisticated take on the science-experiment approach to cocktails. It combines fat-washed Old Forester bourbon, Malmsey Madeira, Demerara sugar, and Angostura bitters. The bar staff prepares the bourbon by infusing it with beef marrow fat for several days before chilling to separate booze and ooze. It’s a round, smooth drink with a full but not greasy mouth-feel and a sweetness quotient somewhere just north of a Manhattan. Or maybe that should be southeast, where Brooklyn is just over the bridge.

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11 2017

Tastes from two banks of the mighty Ohio

Riverboat approaches Abraham Lincoln bridge over the Ohio River.

Long-time readers of HungryTravelers already know that we have a soft spot for the state of Kentucky. (David was born there and Pat’s a Kentucky Colonel.) On our recent visit to Louisville, though, we ventured across the Ohio River to explore the newfound hipster cachet of the southern Indiana communities that go by the catchy rubric of SoIN—as in SoIN to food, SoIN to you, SoIN to music, and so on. It was a tasty journey.

Sorry, folks: some history


Louisville entertainment districtGeography is destiny. The Falls of the Ohio made Louisville possible—and necessary. The 26-foot drop in the Ohio River meant river traffic from the east had to unload at Louisville. Goods were then transported overland and reloaded downriver to make the journey to Cairo, Illinois, and south on the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. Founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark, Louisville quickly became a great warehouse city and a manufacturing center for goods to sell downriver. (That’s bourbon, but more about that in other posts in this series.) The photo above right shows Louisville’s neon-lit entertainment district.

Downtown New Albany, IndianaAcross the Ohio from Louisville, the small Indiana towns of Jeffersonville and New Albany were both carved out of a land grant to Louisville founder and Revolutionary War hero George Rogers Clark. Shipyards and railroads made them prosper. As the first free soil north of the Ohio, they were also powerful magnets on the Underground Railroad while Louisville still held one of the largest slave markets north of New Orleans. (The photo at right is New Albany, Indiana’s more laidback downtown.) For nearly a century, the two banks of the Ohio that had so much in common were divided by the political issues that led to the Civil War. Now they look, sound, and taste more like each other all the time. Together they represent the intersection of the South and the Midwest. They are the land of bourbon and biscuits, of blues and bluegrass, of people south and north steeped in their history but not held hostage by it.

Hands across the water


Big Four Bridge pedestrian crossing of Ohio RiverA bridge is a powerful metaphor, and no fewer than eight of them link Louisville and SoIN. The one at top is the Abraham Lincoln Bridge, carrying I-65 north, but our favorite is the pedestrian Big Four Bridge (at right). It once carried the tracks of the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway line, hence the name. From the Louisville side, the ramp to the bridge is part of Louisville Waterfront Park. The landscaping is less dramatic on the Jeffersonville, Indiana, side, but access is easy—even for wheelchair users. The span is a little under a half mile (2,525 feet), and a casual stroll takes about 20 minutes. (Most of that time is spent climbing up and climbing down at the two ends.) It’s been open at both ends since May 2014, and is patrolled 24 hours a day to ensure safe passage for walkers, runners, rollers, and cyclists.

Art on the rise


Dawn Spyker of Jeffersonville with art quilt projectAcross the bridge from the bright lights of Louisville, look for a colorfully painted water tower. Just as the church towers of southern Indiana were beacons to seekers of freedom, the tower is a beacon to artists. It serves as a marker for a new arts and cultural district where galleries, shops, and artists’ studios are springing up. At right, public arts administrator Dawn Spyker shows a quilt made as a high school group art project to celebrate the Ohio, the great stream that unites as well as divides.

In our explorations of SoIN and Louisville, we found another kind of artistry at work. Not only are the chefs plating up beautiful servings of Southern-inspired cuisine, the bartenders are working the local spirits hard to nice effect. And one of the things we enjoy about the bars in these parts—the folks creating drinks usually go by the handle of “bartender.” It’s a reminder that “mixologists” mostly live east of the Allegheny.

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10 2017