Posts Tagged ‘Mamoiada’

Mamoiada and its wines evoke primal power

Francesco Sedilesu in Ballu Tundo vineyard near Mamoiada
The little community of Mamoiada sits at the foot of the two highest mountain ranges on Sardinia, the Gennargenti and the Supramonte. It is known for two powerful forces: ancient vines of Cannonau and atavistic carnival masks.

The most famous masks are the Mamuthones, shown here. The pre-Christian figures perform in ritual ceremonies that mark the turn of the agricultural calendar from the dark of winter toward the season of spring growth. The parade through Mamoidada predates Lenten carnivals. Men dressed in these shaggy black sheepskins with primitive wooden black masks dance slowly through town, each laden with more than 30 kilos of bronze bells. The figures appear first on January 17, the feast of Sant’ Antonio Abate, when the people of Mamoiada dance around bonfires lit on the town squares. They reappear in processions on the Sunday and Tuesday before Ash Wednesday.

Mamoiada’s museum building includes an archaeological museum that’s tough to grasp unless you already know a lot about Nuragic culture. The same structure also contains the Museo delle Maschere Mediterranee, or the Mediterranean Mask Museum, which explains a bit about the Mamuthones tradition. It’s at Piazza Europa 15 (+39 0784.569.018, www.museodellamaschere.it). Admission is €5.

About the Mamoiada wines

100 year old Cannonau vine in Mamoiada With vineyards located between 600 and 900 meters above sea level, Mamoiada can boast some of the oldest Cannonau vines still producing. Almost all the grapes are grown bush style, and the vines are cut back annually to train them in the “goblet” style. The vine in the photo to the left was planted in the early 20th century, and it still yields a few clusters of grapes each year. The prevalence of such old vines tends to give Mamoiada wines an unusual depth and complexity. The region had a cooperative winery that flourished from 1950 until failing in 1980.

Since then, a few producers have consolidated holdings of older vineyards and have begun vinting their own wines. Most growers follow organic and even biodynamic practices, and most are certified organic. These high-altitude Cannonaus need to stay on the vine a long time to fully ripen the tannins. As a result, many show an alcohol content up to 15.5 percent.

Cantine Giuseppe Sedilesu

Giuseppe Sedilesu winery in MamoiadaThree children of the founders operate this winery that was created in 1981 to fill the gap left by the coop’s failure. The entry-level Cannonau called “Sartiu” is a pleasant young red that shows the youth of the vines (3-15 years) in its comparative lightness. The flagship “Mamuthone” comes from older vines (15-50 years). Sedilesu ferments this wine in stainless steel and ages it briefly in large Slavonian oak barrels. Spicy notes of wood, anise, and eucalyptus grace an otherwise elegant, rich grapiness.

Sedilesu also makes two distinctive riservas. One is named for an ancient circle dance of Barbagia, “Ballu Tundu.” At the top of this post, winemaker Francesco Sedilesu is standing in the vineyard where the grapes grow. The vines range 60-100 years old. This wine ferments for four to six weeks in big conical vats with manual punch-down. (Fermentation is spontaneous, depending on wild yeasts.) The extraction from the skins is extreme, resulting in a very deep color and tannins that stand up to the 15.5 percent alcohol. All the aromas in the Mamuthone are present, along with leather and tobacco. On first taste, it is very spicy with a long finish.

Best of the best

Francesco Sedilesu sips his riservaThe other riserva is named for founder Giuseppe Sedilesu. Only grapes from the lowest yielding plants in the highest parts of the oldest vineyards are selected for this Cannonau di Sardegna Riserva. The winery only makes it in the best vintages. This is the big brother to Ballu Tundu. It is fermented the same way, and also aged in big oak barrels and in bottle before release. Tart cherries, bramble fruit, and elderberries come to mind on the nose and first taste. As it opens up, this riserva blooms into a complex glass of fruit and herbs with notes of almond and hazelnuts. Although it is great with roasted meats, Francesco (above right) considers it a wine for musing.

The winery is located in the center of Mamoiada at Via V. Emanuele II, 64 (+39 0784.567.91, www.giuseppesedilesu.com).

11

01 2017